FREE Minnesota DMV Practical Test

The Minnesota DMV practise examinations include questions based on the Minnesota Driver Handbook's most essential traffic signals and laws. Use actual questions that are very similar (often identical!) to the DMV driving permit test and driver's licence exam to study for the DMV driving permit test and driver's licence.. Read More

The Minnesota DMV practise examinations include questions based on the Minnesota Driver Handbook's most essential traffic signals and laws. Use actual questions that are very similar (often identical!) to the DMV driving permit test and driver's licence exam to study for the DMV driving permit test and driver's licence exam.

On the practise exam, each question gets a tip and explanation to help you remember the concepts. The written component of the official Minnesota DMV test will include questions about traffic rules, traffic signs, and driving statutes, as well as knowledge from the Driver Handbook.

Anyone driving a vehicle on Minnesota's public streets or highways must have a valid driver's licence or learner's permit. When you apply for or renew your driver's licence or learner's permit, your eyes will be checked. The Minnesota DMV written test includes multiple-choice and true or false questions that assess your knowledge and understanding of Minnesota traffic laws, signage, and safety regulations. The Minnesota DMV test consists of 40 questions and is based on information from the official Minnesota Driver's Manual. To pass, you must get 32 right answers (80 percent).

Using any kind of testing assistance will result in an automatic fail, and the DMV may take additional action against your driver's licence, so stay away from it.

40
32
24
To Pass

1 . When parking uphill next to a curb, set the parking brake and:

Turn your steering wheel toward the curb. When parking facing uphill on a street that has a curb, set your parking brake and turn your steering wheel away from the curb. This way, if your vehicle starts to roll, it will roll into the curb.

2 . This sign means:

This sign means:
Yield. This sign means that it is not safe for drivers to enter the indicated road or driveway from their current direction. If you come across one of these signs, you should immediately turn around and drive a different way.

3 . When changing lanes, you can check your blind spots by:

Turning your head and looking over your shoulder. You should turn your head to check your blind spots before every lane change.

4 . You may not cross a single broken white or yellow line:

When passing to the right on a one-way street. You may cross a single broken line to pass or change lanes as long as you can do so safely and without interfering with traffic.

5 . This sign means:

This sign means:
No right turn. This sign prohibits U-turns. Do not make a U-turn where this sign is posted.

6 . A red flashing traffic light has the same meaning as a:

Caution sign. A red flashing traffic signal has the same meaning as a stop sign. When approaching a red flashing signal, come to a complete stop and proceed when it is safe to do so. A stop sign may sometimes also be posted where this signal is located.

7 . Traffic signals sometimes display arrows to control turns from specific lanes. A solid red arrow:

Means that the traffic the arrow is pointing toward must stop. A solid red arrow in a traffic signal means the same thing as a circular red traffic light. When an arrow is red, traffic in the indicated lane must stop and may not turn in the direction that the arrow is pointing.

8 . After being pulled over by law enforcement, a driver should immediately exit the vehicle and quickly approach the officer’s squad car.

If stopped by law enforcement, you should stay in your vehicle with both hands clearly in sight on the steering wheel.

2024 Minnesota | Frequently Asked Questions

To obtain a driver's license in Minnesota, you need to pass a knowledge test and a road test. You must also provide proof of identity, date of birth, and social security number. If you're under 18, you need to complete driver's education and have a parent or guardian's signature on your application.
In Minnesota, the cost to acquire a driver's license varies based on age and type. For a Class D license, it's $32 for ages 18-20, $25.25 for ages 21-64, $20.75 for ages 65 and older. For a provisional driver's license (under 18), it's $19.25. Additional fees may apply for tests or other services.
In Minnesota, the minimum age to obtain a provisional driver's license is 16. However, teenagers can get a learner's permit at 15, provided they are enrolled in driver's education. They must also log at least 50 hours of supervised driving time, including 15 hours at night, before they can apply for a provisional license.
When applying for a driver's license in Minnesota, you need to provide one primary and one secondary document. Primary documents include a valid passport or birth certificate. Secondary documents can be your Social Security card or certified school transcript. If you're under 18, a parent or guardian's signature on the application is required.
In Minnesota, you can schedule a driving test online through the Department of Public Safety's Driver and Vehicle Services division. You may also call your local DVS exam station to make an appointment. Be sure to bring your instructional permit, vehicle with proof of insurance, and fee for the road test.
To get a learner's permit in Minnesota, you must be at least 15 years old and enrolled in a state-approved driver's education course. You'll need to pass a knowledge test and vision exam, provide proof of identity, Social Security number, Minnesota residency, and driver's ed enrollment. You'll also need a parent or guardian's approval if under 18.
In Minnesota, if you're under 18, you must complete at least 50 hours of supervised driving practice, 15 of which must be at night. If your parent or guardian completes a state-approved parent awareness course, the required practice hours drop to 40, with 15 still needing to be at night.
To prepare for the driving test in Minnesota, practice driving in different conditions and routes. Familiarize yourself with the vehicle you'll use for the test. Read the Minnesota Driver's Manual thoroughly to understand road rules and signs. Practice parallel parking, stopping, turning, and lane changing. Also, take online practice tests to gauge your readiness.
Common mistakes to avoid during your driving test include not checking mirrors regularly, failing to signal or incorrect use of signals, poor steering control, misunderstanding road signs or signals, incorrect positioning on the road, and failing to make a complete stop at stop signs. Remember to stay calm, be aware of your surroundings, and follow all traffic laws.
Yes, in Minnesota, you are allowed to use your personal car for the driving test. However, the vehicle must be in good working condition, including functioning lights and safety belts. Additionally, you must show proof of insurance and current registration for the vehicle.
If you fail your driving test in Minnesota, you will not receive your driver's license. You must wait at least one day before retaking the test. If you fail multiple times, further waiting periods may apply. It's recommended to practice and address the issues that caused the failure before reattempting. Fees may apply for each retest.
Yes, in Minnesota, newly licensed drivers under 18 have restrictions for the first six months. They cannot drive between midnight and 5 a.m. unless accompanied by a licensed driver of 25 or older. They also can't carry more than one passenger under 20 unless accompanied by a parent or guardian. Exceptions are made for family members or if the driver is going to/from work or school.
No, in Minnesota, you cannot apply for a driver's license online. You must visit a Driver and Vehicle Services (DVS) exam station in person. The process involves passing a vision screening, knowledge test, and road test. Also, you need to provide proof of identity, residency, and payment for the license fee.
Whether you can drive in other states with a Minnesota learner's permit depends on the rules of the state you're visiting. Some states may honor an out-of-state learner's permit, while others may not. It's essential to check with the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) in the state you plan to visit before you travel.
In Minnesota, a standard driver's license is valid for four years. The expiration date is typically on your birthday. If you are 21 years or older, your license will state "Under 21" until you turn 21, even if the four-year validity period extends past your 21st birthday. Always renew your license before it expires to avoid penalties.
Yes, you can renew your Minnesota driver's license online if you don't need to change your name, address, or signature, and if your current license is not expired for more than one year. You will need your Minnesota driver's license or ID number and a valid email address for this process.
International students or foreign residents in Minnesota must first pass a written knowledge test and vision exam to receive an instruction permit. After practicing driving, they can take a road test. They need to provide proof of legal presence in the US, two residency documents for Minnesota, and their Social Security number (if they have one).
A driver's license grants full driving privileges with no restrictions, while a learner's permit allows a person to drive only under certain conditions. In Minnesota, permit holders under 18 must be accompanied by a licensed driver 21 or older. They're also required to complete a certain amount of supervised driving before they can apply for a driver's license.
Yes, in Minnesota, there are vision-related prerequisites for obtaining a driver's license. Your vision must be at least 20/40 in your best eye, with or without corrective lenses. If your vision is worse than 20/40 but better than 20/70, you may be restricted to daylight driving only. If it's worse than 20/70, you may not be eligible for a license.
Yes, you may use a rental vehicle for your driving test in Minnesota, but there are conditions. The person taking the test must be listed as an authorized driver on the rental agreement. Also, the vehicle must be in safe working condition, insured, and have a current registration. It's advised to check with the rental company's policy before scheduling your test.
In Minnesota, if you fail your driving test, you must wait at least one day before retaking it. However, if you fail the test four times, you'll be required to wait at least 30 days before your next attempt. It's important to use this time to practice the skills where improvement is needed.
To take the DMV written test in Minnesota, you'll need to provide proof of identification, which could be a birth certificate, passport, or state ID. You also need to provide your Social Security number. If you're under 18, you'll need a parent or guardian's signature on the application form. Lastly, you'll need to pay the required testing fee.
Yes, in Minnesota, the DMV written test can be taken in several languages other than English. These include Spanish, Hmong, Vietnamese, Russian, Somali, and more. If you need an interpreter or a test in a language not offered, you can arrange this with the DMV ahead of time.
In Minnesota, if you fail the DMV written test, you must wait until the next day to retake it. There's no limit on how many times you can retake the written test, but each attempt requires a $10 fee. It's advisable to study the Minnesota Driver’s Manual thoroughly before reattempting the test.
In Minnesota, if you fail the DMV written test, you must wait until the next day to retake it. There's no limit to how many times you can retake the test, but each attempt requires a fee. Make sure to review the Minnesota Driver’s Manual before retaking the test.

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